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USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE
Spot and Stain Removers
DSC TROUNCE Dry Solvent Spotter, DESOLV Coffee Stain Remover, EXCLUDE Gum Remover, INVADE Paint Oil and Grease Remover.
 
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Tel: (901) 398-0107
Outside Memphis 1-800-433-3879
e-mail: cleanup@tensupply.com
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Trounce
 
Trounce Dry Solvent Spotter

Trounce is a volatile solvent dry cleaning spotter for colofast carpets and upholstery. Works best as a first try for tar, grease, varnish, lipstick, etc. This is the most versatile spotter you can have. It dries fast and does not set the spot.

Apply on a clean cloth or sponge and wipe over the dirty fabric. Do not dilute Trounce-use as is.

Always rinse with your extractor machine after using Trounce.

This product requires special shipping, which results in extra charges over normal rates. Call for an exact quote for shipping.

Order Number
 
42021
gallon jug
 
44016
pint container
 
44015
8 ounce container
Desolv
 
Desolv Coffee Stain Remover

Quickly loosens and removes stubborn coffee stains. May be used as a bonnet pre-spray or spotter with steam extraction method. Desolv has a minty spring fragrance, so it is very pleasant to use.

Apply Desolv Coffee Stain Remover with a sprayer to soiled area of carpet or upholstery, use a 257N tamping brush, also available from tensupply.com. Allow to stand two minutes before extracting.

Repeat if necessary.

pH3

Buy 4 gallons of Desolv Coffee Stain Remover and save some BIG MONEY!

Order Number
 
42337
gallon jug

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Exclude
Exclude Liquid Gum Remover

Exclude is a special blend of solvents that softens gum for easy extraction. It is easy and economical to use with a reclosable squirt cap top. Do not dilute simply use as is.

Just punch a few holes in the wad of gum on the carpet and apply Exclude. Wait 15 seconds and then extract with hot water.

Buy Exclude in full cases and save BIG MONEY!

Order Number
 
44001
8 ounce bottle

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42019
pint bottle

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42019
gallon jug

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Invade
Invade Paint Oil and Grease Remover

Invade removes difficult oil based stains from carpet such as tar, ballpoint pen ink, shoe polish, lacquers, furniture stains, copier toner, paint, waxes, crayon, lipstick and nail polish.These are just some of the stains Invade can remove from carpets, fabrics and hard surfaces.

Invade works by first dissolving the stain, then holding the oily soil in suspension followed by flushing Invade out with water.

Invade can be diluted with either water or solvent to make a prespray.

To use Invade apply with sprayer or sponge. To prevent damage be careful not to oversaturate the backing of the carpet. Allow approximately five minutes before extracting Invade from the carpet.

pH: 7.5

Buy Invade in full cases and save BIG MONEY!

Order Number
 
44002
8 ounce bottle

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44003
pint bottle

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42104
gallon jug

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TennSpec
Dry Foam Shampoo
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Memphis, Tennessee

Tel: (901) 398-0107

Outside Memphis: 1-800-433-3879

email at cleanup@tensupply.com

[Copyright Information:]

[Copyright 2001-2005 by Tennessee Specialty Supply, Inc., Michael Tata, www.tensupply.com. All rights reserved.]

[Revised] 05/19/07 11:28:51 PM

 

 

Facts About Tennessee

Tennessee was admitted to Statehood on June 1, 1796. Tennessee has a land area of 42,146 sq. mi. making it the 36th in ranking with the other States with a land area of 41, 220 sq. mi. and (34th) and a water area of 926 sq. mi. (32nd). The area codes of Tennessee are 423, 615, 731,865, 901 and 931. The State Bird of Tennessee is the Mockingbird. Tennessee borders more states than any other. Those that border Tennessee include: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina and Virginia. The climate of Tennessee is. Many Colleges and Universities, Community and Technical Colleges are located here. Tennessee derives its economy from agriculture and industry. Its chief agricultural products are: Soybeans, cotton, tobacco, livestock and livestock products, dairy products, cattle and hogs. Industries include: chemicals, transportation equipment, rubber, plastics. The Flag the State of Tennessee has three stars. They represent the three different land forms in Tennessee. Mountains in the east, highlands in the middle and lowlands in the west. On the flag these regions are bound together in an unbroken circle. The field is crimson with a blue background for the stars. The final blue strip relieves the sameness of the crimson field and prevents the flag from showing too much crimson when it is limp. The State Flower of Tennessee is the Iris. The largest cities in Tennessee are Memphis with a population of 671,929. Nashville, 546,719, Knoxville, Chattanooga,154,853, Clarksville, 108,972, Murfreesboro, 81,511, Jackson, 61,772, Johnson City, 57,812, Kingsport, 44,070, and Franklin, 48,191. The total population of Tennessee is 5,689,283, ranking Tennessee as the 16th most populous state. The geographic center of the State of Tennessee is the town of Rutherford, which is 5 miles northeast of Murfreesboro. The highest point in Tennessee is Clingmans Dome at a height of 6,643 feet, making it the 17th highest point in the United States. The lowest point in Tennessee is the Mississippi Riverwhich has an elevation of 182 feet making is the 29th lowest point in the United States. The Tennessee State Motto is Agriculture and Commerce. The Nickname of the State of Tennessee is The Volunteer State. The origin of the name Tennessee comes from a Cherokee Indian village called Tanasi. Several songs have been inspired by the State of Tennessee. They include: The Tennessee Waltz, Tennessee, My Homeland, Tennessee, When It's Iris Time in Tennessee, My Tennessee and Rocky Top. The topography of Tennessee ranges from Rugged country in the east; Great Smokey Mountains of the Uankas; low ridges in the Appalachian Valley; the flat Cumberland Plateau; slightly rolling terrain and knobs of the interior low plateau, the largest region; Eastern Gulf coastal plain to the west, laced with meandering streams; Mississippi alluvial plain, a narrow strip of swamp and flood plain in the extreme west. The State Tree of Tennessee is the Yellow Poplar, Liriodendron tulipifera.  As Indian treaties opened up the land that is now Tennessee for settlement, settlers rushed in to clear farms and establish communities. The new inhabitants sought protection for life and property and other benefits of government–courts of law, militia organizations, and legal title to newly acquired land. Counties were quickly organized once migration into the frontier region had begun. Access to the seat of government was a main difficulty for the pioneers, since it was necessary to travel to the county seat to conduct legal business or present oneself to the court. Over time, residents in areas remote from the county seat would petition the General Assembly for a new county centered closer to their homes. Twenty-two new counties were formed between 1806 and 1819, and twenty-five between 1820 and 1840. This process of carving counties out of the land began in the 1780s and ended a century later. Counties were named for military heroes, American statesmen, physical features, European noblemen, Indian tribes and settlements, and one for a woman. Some counties were authorized but never organized, some organized and then abolished. At present Tennessee has ninety-five counties, each with its own unique story to tell. 96 counties make of the State of Tennessee, they include: Anderson County Created 1801 from Knox and Grainger counties;named in honor of Joseph Anderson (1757-1847), U.S. senator, judge of the Superior Court of the Territory South of the River Ohio (later Tennessee). Bedford County Created 1807 from Rutherford County and Indian lands; named in honor of Thomas Bedford, Jr. (? - 1804), Revolutionary War officer, middle Tennessee land owner of Jefferson Springs in Rutherford County. Benton County Created 1835 from Humphreys County; named in honor of David Benton (1779-1860), member of the Third Regiment, Tennessee Militia in the Creek wars. Bledsoe County Created 1807 from Roane County and Indian lands; named in honor of Anthony Bledsoe (1733-1788), colonial and Revolutionary War soldier, surveyor, Tennessee militia colonel and early settler of Sumner County who was killed by Indians. Blount County Created 1795 from Knox County; named in honor of William Blount (1749-1800), member of the Continental Congress, governor of the Territory South of the River Ohio (later Tennessee), founder of Knoxville. Bradley County Created 1836 from Indian lands; named in honor of Edward Bradley (? - 1829), Tennessee militia officer, colonel of First Regiment, Tennessee Infantry in the War of 1812, member of the Tennessee state house and the Shelby County court. Campbell County Created 1806 from Anderson and Claiborne counties; named (reportedly) in honor of Arthur Campbell (1743-1811), member of Virginia House of Burgesses. Cannon County Created 1836 from Rutherford, Smith and Warren counties; named in honor of Newton Cannon (1781-1841), Creek War and War of 1812 soldier, Tennessee state senator, U.S. congressman, first Whig governor of Tennessee. Carroll County Created 1821 from Indian lands; named in honor of William Carroll (1788-1844), colonel and majorgeneral in the War of 1812, governor of Tennessee for six terms, known as Tennessee’s “reform governor.” Carter County Created 1796 from Washington County; named in honor of Landon Carter (1760-1800), treasurer of Washington and Hamilton districts of North Carolina, speaker of the State of Franklin senate. Cheatham County Created 1856 from Davidson, Dickson, Montgomery and Robertson counties; named in honor of Edward Cheatham (1818-1878), member of Tennessee state house, member and speaker of the state senate, businessman and railroad president. Chester County Created 1879 from Hardeman, Henderson, McNairy and Madison counties; named in honor of Robert I. Chester (1793-1892), quartermaster in the War of 1812, colonel in Texas war for independence. Claiborne County Created 1801 from Grainger and Hawkins counties; named in honor of William C. C. Claiborne (1775-1817), judge of the superior court of Tennessee, U.S. congressman and senator, governor of the Mississippi Territory and of Louisiana. Clay County Created 1870 from Jackson and Overton counties; named in honor of Henry Clay (1777-1852), member of the Kentucky state house and senate. Cocke County Created 1797 from Jefferson County; named in honor of William Cocke (1748-1828), Revolutionary and War of 1812 soldier, member of legislatures of Virginia, North Carolina, State of Franklin, Territory South of the River Ohio, Tennessee and Mississippi; Chickasaw Indian Agent. Coffee County Created 1836 from Bedford, Warren and Franklin counties; named in honor of John Coffee (1772-1833), Creek War and War of 1812 cavalry commander. Crockett County Created 1871 from Haywood, Madison, Dyer and Gibson counties; named in honor of David Crockett (1786-1836), frontier humorist, author, soldier, state legislator, U.S. congressman, defender and a casualty of the Alamo in the Texas war for independence. Cumberland County Created 1855 from White, Bledsoe, Rhea, Morgan, Fentress and Putnam counties; named in honor of the Cumberland Mountains which Thomas Walker may have named for the Duke of Cumberland. Davidson County Created 1783 by Act of North Carolina; named in honor of William Lee Davidson (ca. 1746-1781), colonial soldier, Revolutionary War officer in the North Carolina Third, Fourth and Fifth Regiments. Decatur County Created 1845 from Perry County; named in honor of Stephen Decatur (1779-1820), American naval officer. DeKalb County Created 1837 from Franklin, Cannon, Jackson and White counties; named in honor of Johann DeKalb (1721-1780), German baron. Dickson County Created 1803 from Montgomery and Robertson counties; named in honor of William Dickson (1770-1816), Nashville physician, member and speaker of the state house, U.S. congressman, trustee of the University of Nashville. Dyer County Created 1823 from Indian lands; named in honor of Robert Henry Dyer (ca. 1774-1826), Creek and War of 1812 officer, cavalry colonel in the 1818 Seminole War, state senator, instrumental figure in formation of Dyer and Madison counties. Fayette County Created 1824 from Indian lands; named in honor of the Marquis de la Fayette (1757-1834), French nobleman. Fentress County Created 1823 from Morgan, Overton and White counties; named in honor of James Fentress (1763-1843), speaker of the state house, chairman of Montgomery County Court, commissioner to select seats for Haywood, Carroll, Gibson and Weakley counties. Franklin County Created 1807 from Rutherford County and Indian lands; named in honor of Benjamin Franklin. Gibson County Created 1823 from Indian lands; named in honor of John H. Gibson (? - 1823), who served with distinction under Andrew Jackson in the Natchez Expedition (1812-1813) and in the Creek Wars. Giles County Created 1809 from Indian lands; named in honor of William B. Giles (1762-1830), Virginia state legislator, U.S. congressman and senator from Virginia who advocated admission of Tennessee into the Union in 1796, governor of Virginia. Grainger County Created 1796 from Hawkins and Knox counties; named in honor of Mary Grainger (? - 1802), daughter of Kaleb Grainger of North Carolina, who married William Blount and became first lady of the Territory South of the River Ohio (later Tennessee). Greene County Created 1783 from Washington County; named in honor of Nathanael Greene (1742-1786), Revolutionary War commander at Trenton who succeeded Horatio Gates in command of the Army of the South and forced the British out of Georgia and the Carolinas. Grundy County Created 1844 from Coffee, Warren and Franklin counties; named in honor of Felix Grundy (1777-1840), chief justice of the Kentucky Supreme Court, U.S. congressman and senator from Tennessee. Hamblen County Created 1870 from Jefferson, Grainger and Greene counties; named in honor of Hezekiah Hamblen (1775-1854), early settler, landowner, attorney and member of the Hawkins County circuit and county courts. Hamilton County Created 1819 from Rhea County and Indian lands; named in honor of Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804), American statesman, Revolutionary War soldier, member of the Continental Congress and secretary of the U.S. treasury under President Washington. Hancock County Created 1844 from Hawkins and Claiborne counties; named in honor of John Hancock (1737-1793), president of the Continental Congress, first signer of the Declaration of Independence, Revolutionary War militia officer, governor of Massachusetts. Hardeman County Created 1823 from Hardin County and Indian lands; named in honor of Thomas Jones Hardeman (1788-1854), Creek War and War of 1812 soldier, prominent figure in the fight for Texas independence and Republic of Texas Congressman. Hardin County Created 1819 from Indian lands; named in honor of Joseph Hardin (1734-1801), Revolutionary War soldier, speaker of the State of Franklin legislature, and member and speaker of the territorial legislature whose sons settled Hardin County. Hawkins County Created 1786 from Sullivan County; named in honor of Benjamin Hawkins (1754-1818), member of the North Carolina legislature and the Continental Congress. Haywood County Created 1823 from Indian lands; named in honor of John Haywood (1762-1826), North Carolina Superior Court and Tennessee Supreme Court judge, author of Civil & Political History of Tennessee, “father of Tennessee history.” Henderson County Created 1821 from Indian lands; named in honor of James Henderson (fl.1815), commander of Tennessee troops preceding the Battle of New Orleans. Henry County Created 1821 from Indian lands; named in honor of Patrick Henny (1736-1799), Virginia statesman, patriot and Revolutionary leader, member of the Virginia colonial and state legislatures and the Continental Congress, governor of Virginia. Hickman County Created 1807 from Dickson County; named in honor of Edwin Hickman (?-1791), longhunter who while on a mission to survey land on the Piney River was killed by Indians near the present site of Centerville. Houston County Created 1871 from Dickson, Humpheys, Montgomery and Stewart counties; named in honor of Sam Houston (1793-1863), U.S. congressman from and governor of Tennessee, Texas war for independence commander, president of the Texas Republic, U.S. senator from Texas. Humphreys County Created 1809 from Stewart County; named in honor of Parry Wayne Humphreys (1778-1839), judge of the Superior Court of Tennessee, U.S. representative from Tennessee. Jackson County Created 1801 from Smith County and Indian lands; named in honor of Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), U.S. congressman and senator, Tennessee Supreme Court judge, troop commander at the Battle of New Orleans, seventh U.S. president. Jefferson County Created 1792 from Greene and Hawkins counties; named in honor of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), member of the Virginia House of Burgesses and the Continental Congress, governor of Virginia, U.S. secretary of state, third U.S. president. Johnson County Created 1836 from Carter County; named in honor of Thomas Johnson (ca. 1836), early settler of Carter County on the Doe River, prominent citizen and one of the first magistrates of Johnson County. Knox County Created 1792 from Greene and Hawkins counties; named in honor of Henry Knox (1750-1806), American Revolutionary War artillery commande. Lake County Created 1870 from Obion County; named for Reelfoot Lake, formed by a series of earthquakes in 1811 that dammed the Reelfoot River and altered the course of the Mississippi River, an area now part of the state park system. Lauderdale County Created in 1835 from Haywood, Dyer and Tipton counties; named in honor of James Lauderdale ( ?-1814), Indian War and War of 1812 officer who fell leading troops against the British in 1814, a few days before the Battle of New Orleans. Lawrence County Created 1817 from Hickman County and Indian lands; named in honor of James Lawrence (1781-1813), American naval officer. Lewis County Created 1843 from Hickman, Lawrence, Mauryand Wayne counties; named in honor of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809), appointee of President Jefferson to explore the Louisiana Purchase in 1804. Lincoln County Created 1809 from Bedford County; named in honor of Benjamin Lincoln (1733-1810), American Revolutionary officer, U.S. secretary of war, commander of forces that suppressed Shay’s Rebellion in 1787 and lieutenant governor of Massachusetts. Loudon County Created 1870 from Roane, Monroe, Blount and McMinn counties; named for Fort Loudoun, erected 1756 by the British and named in honor of the Earl of Loudoun. Macon County Created 1842 from Smith and Sumner counties; named in honor of Nathaniel Macon (1757-1837), Revolutionary War Soldier, North Carolina legislator, congressman and senator, president of the 1835 North Carolina Constitutional Convention. Madison County Created 1821 from Indian lands; named in honor of James Madison (1751-1836), member of the Continental Congress, the 1787 Constitutional Convention and the U.S. Congress, U.S. secretary of state and fourth U.S. president. Marion County Created 1817 from Indian lands; named in honor of Francis Marion (1732-1795), continental and Revolutionary War officer. Marshall County Created 1836 from Giles, Bedford, Lincoln and Maury counties; named in honor of John Marshall (1755-1835), Revolutionary War soldier and Federalist leader. Maury County Created 1807 from Williamson County and Indian lands; named in honor of Abram Poindexter Maury, Sr. (1766-1825), pioneer, farmer, lawyer, civil engineer who laid out the town of Franklin in the late 1790s. McMinn County Created 1819 from Indian lands; named in honor of Joseph McMinn (1758-1824), militia commander, member of territorial legislature, speaker of the state senate, governor of Tennessee. McNairy County Created 1823 from Hardin County; named in honor of John McNairy (1762-1837), North Carolina Superior Court judge for Mero District, U.S. district judge for Tennessee, Davidson Academy trustee. Meigs County Created 1836 from Rhea County; named in honor of Return Jonathan Meigs (1740-1823), Tennessee country pioneer, American Revolutionary officer. Monroe County Created 1819 from Indian lands; named in honor of James Monroe (1758-1831), American Revolutionary War soldier, member of the Continental Congress and the U.S. Senate, governor of Virginia, U.S. secretary of state and of war, fifth U.S. president. Montgomery County Created 1796 from Tennessee County; named in honor of John Montgomery (?-1794), explorer, Revolutionary War officer, signer of the Cumberland Compact, founder of Clarksville, Nickajack Expedition commander who was killed by Indians in Kentucky. Moore County Created 1871 from Bedford, Lincoln and Franklin counties; named in honor of William Moore (1786-1871), early settler, Lincoln County justice of the peace. Morgan County Created 1817 from Anderson and Roane counties; named in honor of Daniel Morgan (1736-1802), American Revolutionary War officer who commanded the troops that defeated the British at Cowpens, and U.S. congressman from Virginia. Obion County Created 1823 from Indian lands; named for the Obion River. Overton County Created 1806 from Jackson County and Indian lands; named in honor of John Overton (1766-1833), pioneer attorney, supporter of Andrew Jackson, Tennessee Supreme Court judge, cofounder (with Jackson and James Winchester) of Memphis. Perry County Created 1819 from Humphreys and Hickman counties; named in honor of Oliver Hazard Perry (1785-1819), American War of 1812 naval officer. Pickett County Created 1879 from Fentress and Overton counties; named in honor of Howell L. Pickett (1847-after 1909), attorney and member of Tennessee state house from Wilson County who moved to Arizona and continued his career in law and politics. Polk County Created 1839 from McMinn and Bradley counties; named in honor of James Knox Polk (1795-1849), clerk of the state senate, member of the state house, member and speaker of the U.S. House, governor of Tennessee, eleventh U.S. President. Putnam County Created 1854 from Fentress, Jackson, Smith, White and Overton counties; named in honor of Israel Putnam (1718-1790), French and Indian War soldier. Rhea County Created 1807 from Roane County; named in honor of John Rhea (1753-1832), Revolutionary War soldier, member of North Carolina and Tennessee state houses, member of U.S. Congress. Roane County Created 1801 from Knox County and Indian lands; named in honor of Archibald Roane (1760-1819), 1796 Constitutional Convention delegate. Robertson County Created 1796 from Tennessee and Sumner counties; named in honor of James Robertson (1742-1814), pioneer, surveyor, soldier, founder of the Watauga Settlements and of Nashville, and state senator, known as “Father of Tennessee." Rutherford County Created 1803 from Davidson, Williamson and Wilson counties; named in honor of Griffith Rutherford (1721-1805), North Carolina legislator, Indian War soldier, chairman of the legislature of the Territory South of the River Ohio (later Tennessee). Scott County Created 1849 from Anderson, Campbell, Fentress and Morgan counties; named in honor of Winfield Scott (1786-1866), War of 1812 soldier and commander of U.S. troops. Sequatchie County Created 1857 from Hamilton, Marion and Warren counties, the name linked with a Cherokee word “sequachee,” probably meaning “opossum. Sevier County Created 1794 from Jefferson County; named in honor of John Sevier (1745-1815), governor of the State of Franklin, territorial militia officer, U. S. congressman from North Carolina and Tennessee, state senator and first governor of Tennessee. Shelby County Created 1819 from Indian lands; named in honor of Isaac Shelby (1750-1826), Revolutionary War troop commander at Kings Mountain, first governor of Kentucky. Smith County Created 1799 from Sumner County and Indian lands; named in honor of Daniel Smith (1748-1818), surveyor, Revolutionary War officer, secretary of the Territory South of the River Ohio (later Tennessee). Stewart County Created 1803 from Montgomery County; named in honor of Duncan Stewart (1752-1815), member of the North Carolina legislature, early settler, Tennessee state senator, surveyor-general and lieutenant governor of the Mississippi Territory. Sullivan County Created 1779 from Washington County; named in honor of John Sullivan (1740-1795), Revolutionary War officer, member of the Continental Congress,attorney general, legislator, U.S. district judge and governor of New Hampshire. Sumner County Created 1786 from Davidson County; named in honor of Jethro Sumner (1733-1785), French and Indian War soldier, Revolutionary War commander at Charleston, Brandywine and Germantown who defended North Carolina against Cornwallis in 1780. Tipton County Created 1823 from Indian lands; named in honor of Jacob Tipton (?-1791), organizer for the defense of the Northwest Territory against hostile Indians. Trousdale County Created 1870 from Wilson, Macon, Smith and Sumner counties; named in honor of William Trousdale (1790-1872), “War Horse of Sumner County,” Creek and Mexican War soldier and officer, state senator and governor of Tennessee. Unicoi County Created 1875 from Washington and Carter counties, the name of which, shared with the Southern Appalachian mountains in the area, probably derives from an Indian word “u’nika” meaning white, foglike, or fog-draped. Union County Created 1850 from Grainger, Claiborne, Campbell, Anderson and Knox counties; named possibly for the "union" of fragments of five counties, or for the strong feelings in eastern Tennessee for the preservation of the Federal Union. Van Buren County Created 1840 from Warren and White counties; named in honor of Martin Van Buren (1782-1862), attorney general and governor of New York, U.S. senator from New York, U.S. secretary of state, eighth U.S. president. Warren County Created 1807 from White, Jackson, Smith counties and Indian lands; named in honor of Joseph Warren (1741-1775), Revolutionary War officer who sent Paul Revere on his famous midnight ride to Lexington in 1775. Washington County Created 1777 by Act of North Carolina; named in honor of George Washington (1732-1799), member of the Virginia House of Burgesses and the Continental Congress, Revolutionary War commander unanimously elected first U.S. president. Wayne County Created 1817 from Hickman County; named in honor of daring “Mad Anthony” Wayne (1745-1796), American statesman and officer. Weakley County Created 1823 from Indian lands; named in honor of Robert Weakley (1764-1845), Revolutionary War soldier, state legislator, U.S. congressman, U.S. commissioner to treat with Chickasaws, 1834 Tennessee Constitutional Convention delegate. White County Created 1806 from Jackson and Smith counties; named in honor of John White (1751-1846), Revolutionary War soldier who saw action at Brandywine, Germantown and Stony Point, and was the first white settler of White County. Williamson County Created 1799 from Davidson County; named in honor of Hugh Williamson (1735-1819), surgeongeneral of North Carolina troops in the American Revolution, North Carolina legislator. Wilson County Created 1799 from Sumner County; named in honor of David Wilson (1752-1804?), Revolutionary War soldier, member of the North Carolina legislature and the legislature of the Territory South of the River Ohio (later Tennessee).